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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - A Baby

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Ironically, she's been cheating with his twin.

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Last full day to submit your proposal for BAH Houston!

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anotherwise
132 days ago
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Or all siblings and cousins.
Manila
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Three Laws of Robotics

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OH MY GOD THEY'RE SELF-REPLICATING

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anotherwise
455 days ago
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Manila
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llucax
458 days ago
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WE ARE DOOOOOMED!
Berlin

Who’s the coder here?

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Strip-Brutal-#2-(650-final)(english)

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anotherwise
576 days ago
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Never checked the manual B|
Manila
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Love and Rockets

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Hovertext: Now if we could just perfect the reusable first booster...


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popular
582 days ago
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anotherwise
584 days ago
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Manila
francisga
584 days ago
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Lafayette, LA, USA
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Philosophy Overdose

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Nietzsche was brilliant and all, but any time someone says that they are
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anotherwise
607 days ago
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Manila
toddgrotenhuis
607 days ago
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Indianapolis
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How many digits of pi does NASA use?

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Mathematicians have calculated pi out to more than 13 trillion decimal places, a calculation that took 208 days. NASA's Marc Rayman explains that in order to send out probes and slingshot them accurately throughout the solar system, NASA needs to use only 15 decimal places, or 3.141592653589793. How precise are calculations with that number? This precise:

The most distant spacecraft from Earth is Voyager 1. It is about 12.5 billion miles away. Let's say we have a circle with a radius of exactly that size (or 25 billion miles in diameter) and we want to calculate the circumference, which is pi times the radius times 2. Using pi rounded to the 15th decimal, as I gave above, that comes out to a little more than 78 billion miles. We don't need to be concerned here with exactly what the value is (you can multiply it out if you like) but rather what the error in the value is by not using more digits of pi. In other words, by cutting pi off at the 15th decimal point, we would calculate a circumference for that circle that is very slightly off. It turns out that our calculated circumference of the 25 billion mile diameter circle would be wrong by 1.5 inches. Think about that. We have a circle more than 78 billion miles around, and our calculation of that distance would be off by perhaps less than the length of your little finger.

When was humanity's calculation of pi accurate enough for NASA? In 1424, Persian astronomer and mathematician Jamshid al-Kashi calculated pi to 17 digits.

Tags: Jamshid al-Kashi   Marc Rayman   mathematics   NASA   science
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jimwise
610 days ago
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...
anotherwise
609 days ago
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Manila
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609 days ago
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2 public comments
cmlburnett
608 days ago
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Of course, π to 15 digits doesn't matter if you don't know Voyager's distance from Earth to 15 digits, which wasn't mentioned.
theprawn
609 days ago
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One point five inches...


Good enough for me.
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